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 Dominant horse

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Tango



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Join date : 2009-10-02

PostSubject: Dominant horse   Wed May 11, 2011 10:58 am

I'll ask here too since I'm really looking for lots of suggestions to find what will work best...

The head gelding in our little herd is starting to try and walk all over us lately. A few weeks ago when the farrier was here, the weather was icky so we took him in the barn. He objected strongly and pretty much ran me over to get back out with his buddies. The farrier got hold of him and I put the lead chain over his nose. By the time he was on the second foot and I'd given him a couple snaps to the chain and his head was down and he was fine. Then again had to resort to the chain over the nose when we tried to worm him yesterday. He was putting his head up and trying to run over us. Once I had the chain over his nose, if he took one step forward when not asked I backed him up. My daughter would bring the wormer tube close, then take away again and again until he relaxed a bit. I need to deal with this behaviour before it gets more out of hand. Not sure if using the chain is the best choice but my bag of tricks is pretty limited. We had a rope halter on him last night but had to go back to the flat with the chain - although when I think about it, this rope halter didn't have the knots on the nose.

We had set up a round pen and have started trying to go back to lots of ground work and respectful leading, any other ideas? It doesn't help that you just get in a training groove and the weather turns and now everything is a sea of mud and places to work with him are limited.
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Barefoot_Horsegirl

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PostSubject: Re: Dominant horse   Wed May 11, 2011 11:29 am

As a trimmer, I prefer to have at least two horses present in the barn when I am trimming. It makes them both calm and relaxed, which makes it easier for ME. Pick your battles. When the farrier is trimming his feet it isn't the time to start training him to be away from his buddies. When the time is appropriate, can you start seperating him? Take him in the barn, brush him, feed him, work on basic ground work in the aisle, stall him, spend time with him. Make it positive!

Working on ground work in the round pen will help a lot as well I think.
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Tango



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PostSubject: Re: Dominant horse   Wed May 11, 2011 11:35 am

Thanks. Our little barn has two stalls and an empty space where we were trimming. There were two others horses inside and one tied just outside. So he wasn't completely separated, I guess I was trying to keep my post short lol, which I always find a challenge. It just seems lately anytime we want him to do something he doesn't want to it is a battle.

I am going to suggest to my daughter that she and I bring our boys in for awhile tonight and groom etc. If he acts up and is a turkey what do we do? He and my gelding are on 24 hr turnout and the young fellow and the old mare go in at night in bad weather as he won't let them in the run in. So he does have alot of freedom to do "his own thing" all day.
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Barefoot_Horsegirl

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PostSubject: Re: Dominant horse   Wed May 11, 2011 11:55 am

I thought the other horses were out grazing and he was the only one in the barn. Not the case. :)

If this is a new behaviour, have you ruled out pain? When were his teeth done last?



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Tango



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PostSubject: Re: Dominant horse   Wed May 11, 2011 12:05 pm

Hmmm, I don't think it is new, he acted up at the 4H prov. fair last year, he scared my daughter when she went to bridle him and just about trampled her trying to get out of the stall. At this point the other horse that we had brought was out of the barn waiting to go in the ring. When he first came my daughter couldn't get him to back up at all from the ground but now he will - more so for her than me.

He eats well, is in good condition. The vet was just here and gave needles I didn't get him to check teeth as he doesn't seem to have any trouble. I don't know if he will let me check or not. He was good for the vet. Stood without a twitch for his needle. Maybe there is the man/woman thing going on. I should get my hubby to come see if he can stick a wormer in his mouth??

He is good under saddle, was a little squirrely first thing this spring but has settled back down to the very nice trail horse he is.

Thanks
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SexyDexy

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PostSubject: Re: Dominant horse   Fri May 13, 2011 12:22 pm

I have a huge problem with one of mine and dominance. Add into the mix that he is a fearful horse, and he can be dangerous at times. He was a stud for 11 years so I understand that is is naturally going to try and be more dominant which is fine with his herd. But with me, I expect him to do what I say and he gets swiftly corrected when he has other plans. Problem is, he gets extremely fearful when you discipline him and will do whatever he has to to get away - break ties, run through fences/gate/posts, or run you over. And when I discipline, I mean a hard smack or my best bear impression, nothing that would make the average horse react the way he does.

Whenever he starts acting up I take him directly to the round pen and work with him until he shows signs of calming down. It can be hard at times like in the morning when I have to go to work but if I don't take the time to do it, he will think he got away with things. Lately he's taken a disliking to being tied to be brushed (or dewormed like I did last weekend). He broke a halter and a carabiner clip in that episode so everyday since I've been tying him to that spot for a few minutes while I pick poo so that he gets it out of his head that he can leave when ever he wants to. Hard on my nerves that horse is lol! The thing that really peeves me is that my yound fella is picking up some of the same behaviours and he used to be a very quiet, respectful fella.
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Tango



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PostSubject: Re: Dominant horse   Fri May 13, 2011 12:32 pm

Thanks, I just don't like having to resort to the chain, but I can't compromise someone's safety. From what you and others are saying I feel like I am on the right track with ground work, round pen etc. He is one of those guys who I guess if we give an inch even by accident he thinks he can have the mile.

I wonder how weird I would sound if I asked for sand for my birthday lol. Have to get a small pen with good footing!!
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SexyDexy

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PostSubject: Re: Dominant horse   Fri May 13, 2011 12:59 pm

I rarely lead George without a chain. He will try and test me without it and knows when it's there. Sometimes I use the rope halter but from the pasture to the barn he just has a regular turnout halter on so I always put the chain on.
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~TC~



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PostSubject: Re: Dominant horse   Fri May 13, 2011 7:44 pm

what does he eat?

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Tango



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PostSubject: Re: Dominant horse   Fri May 13, 2011 7:49 pm

My guy or SD's?
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